Wheelchairs a ‘bonus’ for home

Resident Murial Phillips with Carol Milne, Megan McDougall, Jennifer Lauder, Jill Latimer and Annabelle Anderson from Grangepark and Dave Thompson from Baxters Mobility Centre
Resident Murial Phillips with Carol Milne, Megan McDougall, Jennifer Lauder, Jill Latimer and Annabelle Anderson from Grangepark and Dave Thompson from Baxters Mobility Centre

Grangepark Care Home in Peterhead has purchased four electric wheelchairs thanks to funding from Your Voice Your Choice.

The home received £8,500 through the community funding scheme after their bid was backed by local supporters.

Manager Jennifer Lauder wrote a poem about the ‘Grangepark Galavanters’ in the hope that they would get some funds for the wheelchairs.

Jennifer said: “We decided to focus on wheelchairs because it is so difficult taking residents out as there are hills everywhere.

“The poem is about getting someone up the Lido brae in a wheelchair because it is the most challenging area in the town.

“We didn’t think we would get anything but we had a lot of support online and on the night of the vote so we are absolutely delighted.

“We would like to thank the Your Choice Your Voice committee and everyone that voted for us, and also local firm Baxters Mobilty Centre for giving us a great servicing deal on the wheelchairs and for being so helpful.”

The winning poem:

It was on that special, wonderful and sunny day, when the sun shines in Peterheid and the rain goes away.

“Summer” had arrived and the Grangepark residents started rantin’, “It’s time to get out in that sunshine and dae some galavantin’.

Now Grangepark care is second to none so we asked Alec to say, And give his best suggestion for an outing that would get us on our way.

Alec had a thinkie about his choice for galavantin’ on this bonnie day, And clearly stated at the top of his voice “fit aboot a trippie to the Lido Cafe.”

Well, volunteers to push him disappeared like sna aff a dike,

And you’ll understand why when you think about fit the Lido brae is like.

It was gan to be bad enough to get him doon without him landin’ in the bay, but Glory! How to get him back up and how much would we hae to pay.

So double checking the brakes and wi ma heart in ma moo,

I started doon the brae, I hope the family disna sue!

My arms were screamin’ and my heels were skint, as I clung for dear life to the chair, and off doon that hill I went.

With a sharp right on my way doon, I headed for the door. Cramps in my arms I needed tea and a fine piece before I could do anymore.

Revived by my tea and a great big meringue, enough sugar to fuel me to the best I can. To get Alec back up that mountainous brae, without having a heart attack and dying the day.

Every step harder, push push, dinna stop, head for that ambulance that’s parked at the top. My heid was doon as I pushed, “are we there yet?” I call, “You are, come and get some oxygen,” God I’ve niver been sae glaed to see Dr Small.

One hour of medical checks and the doctors advise heeded, I had been very lucky, Robert Mackie was not to be needed.

Dr Small insisted that my career was finished that day, for never again would I push a wheelchair up the Lido brae.

The moral of the story is to make life easy, and still have Grangepark Galavantin’ when the days are bright and breezy.

Purchase of new wheelchairs preferably the electric model, nae mair pushin’ and straining the job would surely be a doddle.

So vote for Grangepark Galavantin’ if you do I have no doubt, You’ll see us in the Lido Cafe the next time we get out.’