DCSIMG

Traffic preparatory works get go-ahead

The scaffolding in Peterhead's Chapel Street has been hugely controversial.

The scaffolding in Peterhead's Chapel Street has been hugely controversial.

Bollards are to be erected the length of Chapel Street and onto Marischal Street in Peterhead in preparation for the re-introduction of traffic to the town centre thoroughfare.

Members of the Buchan area committee approved the move when they met in Peterhead on Tuesday.

Councillors were asked to give the go-ahead to the works programme ahead of the reo-opening of Chapel Street to traffic for a two-year trial period.

The proposed works involve the installation of bollards the length of Chapel Street between Back Street and Marischal Street and onto Marischal Street to meet with the top of Broad Street.

Opponents to the proposals said that with no additional parking there would be no benefit in opening the road, while increased traffic may damage the road surface.

They also complained of potential traffic noise and road safety issues.

The objectors also felt that the trial period was too long and would require regular monitoring, while they also believed that a 20mph speed restriction should be enforced.

It was also felt that additional crossing spaces would be required.

In a report to members, planning chief Stephen Archer said that the installation of bollards would have a minimal impact on the appearance of the historic streetscape.

And replying to the concerns, he stated: “The planning service has no role in establishing the need for opening this road to public traffic which has previously been considered by the area committee.

“The application is only considering the impact of the required engineering works associated with it and the changes to the Conservation area.”

Councillors at the Buchan Area Committee agreed with the move but decided to put the plans to public consultation for a period of 21 days so local residents can voice their support or objections to the proposed traffic order.

 

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