DCSIMG

Recruitment drive for community police

FRASERBURGH POLICE ARE INCREASING FOOT PATROLS IN THE WESTSHORE AREA TO COMBAT ILLICIT DRINKING. (BUCHAN/BROWN)

FRASERBURGH POLICE ARE INCREASING FOOT PATROLS IN THE WESTSHORE AREA TO COMBAT ILLICIT DRINKING. (BUCHAN/BROWN)

A new recruitment drive has been launched by Police Scotland in the North East for officers in the Community Policing Teams.

Aberdeen City Division and also Aberdeenshire and Moray Divisions of Police Scotland currently have vacancies for Police Constables and are inviting people interested in making a difference to local communities to apply.

Being a police officer is a challenging and unpredictable job - as you leave for your daily patrol, there’s no knowing what you might encounter - but it’s also rewarding like no other.

Police Constables deal with the community every day: providing the initial response to incidents; searching people, premises and vehicles; interviewing suspects, victims and witnesses; taking statements; preparing reports; making enquiries into crimes and offences; making arrests; preserving crime scenes and presenting evidence in court.

Officers start as a probationary officer for two years. The first 12 weeks are completed at Scottish Police College in Tulliallan near Stirling and thereafter recruits are posted to local police offices.

The starting salary is £23,493 rising to £26,223 after completing 31 weeks of the initial training. The salary then rises again to £27,747 on completion of two years service when officers are confirmed.

PC McShane joined as a Police Constable last year, and commented: “I was keen to join as a police officer as the job is so varied and is not a normal 9-5 career. I had worked as a football coach for a community football team working in housing schemes with 6-21 year olds, which I really enjoyed but I was attracted to join the police where I could make even more of a difference.

“I completed the initial training at Police College at the end of November last year and I’ve been working on the beat since then. I’ve already been involved in dealing with executing warrants, attending domestic incidents, road traffic collisions, missing persons enquiries and antisocial behaviour incidents.

“Every day is different and you never know what you’re going to be called to next. I’m really glad I joined.”

For further information on becoming a police officer, the selection process and to download a copy of the application form, visit Police Scotland website www.scotland.police.uk/recruitment

 

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