Lifeboat station in appeal for relatives

Peterhead Lifeboat deputy second cox Peter Duncan and Cox Andy Brown with the plaque commemorating the tragedy of 1914 when three crew members were lost at sea
Peterhead Lifeboat deputy second cox Peter Duncan and Cox Andy Brown with the plaque commemorating the tragedy of 1914 when three crew members were lost at sea

The Peterhead Lifeboat Station crew are trying to contact relatives of crew members that were lost at sea 100 years ago.

A private memorial service is to be held to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the loss of the Peterhead Lifeboat Alexander Tulloch on service, but the RNLI crew are struggling to find the right contacts.

They are particularly interested in contacting relations of John Davidson, 3 Threadneedle Street; William Buchan, 31 Roanheads and Peter Geddes, 2 Seagate.

If you know of or are related to any of the mentioned crew members then please call the Peterhead Lifeboat Station on 01779 473331 as soon as possible.

The service will include a wreath laying in the water in the area where the vessel sank.

The tragedy happened on Saturday, December 26, 1914 when the Hull trawler Tom Tit ran ashore in a fierce southerly gale on a rock located within a hundred yards of the entrance to the Peterhead South Harbour.

The Buchan Observer reported on the incident back in 1914: “Late on Friday night a strong southerly wind arose and increased in intensity until it blew with hurricane force during the night and on Saturday morning.

“The sea running in the South Bay on Saturday forenoon was exceptionally high, the waves breaking on the north shore of the bay and the harbour breakwater with overwhelming force, and sweeping far up the strand.

“To any vessel seeking shelter the harbour entrance was extremely difficult and dangerous.

“Shortly before eleven o’clock forenoon the Hull trawler Tom Tit was observed making for the South harbour entrance.

“Her passage through the bay was watched by the people on shore with great anxiety, as it was feared that they could not make the harbour with wind and sea sweeping right across the entrance.

“The fears of the onlookers were realised, as the vessel was forced on to “The Horseback,” the mountainous sea sweeping over her and threatening the imminent destruction of vessel and crew.

“By this time a great crowd had congregated on shore, and there was gallant hearts in it ready to risk their lives for the sake of those in dire danger.

“Meantime the motor lifeboat Alexander Tulloch whose headquarters are within 50 yards of the scene of the wreck, had in face of the tremendous waves, managed to put out to the bay its task of trying to save the shipwrecked crew.”

The three men who lost their lives were Thomas Adams, David Murray Strachan and James Geddes, while James Cameron, John Strachan, Robert Slessor, John Davidson, William Buchan, Peter Geddes, Andrew McLean, William Cameron and Charles Cameron were saved.