Families take time travel journey

GeoBus Geologist, Kathryn Roper, explains the local geological significance of an asteroid that hit Mexico 66 million years ago.
GeoBus Geologist, Kathryn Roper, explains the local geological significance of an asteroid that hit Mexico 66 million years ago.

Buchan families were transported 145-million years back in time on a journey through the geological history of the Goldeneye reservoir recently.

Shell, in collaboration with the Global CCS Institute and GeoBus, hosted a fun, family-friendly 2.5km walk along the coastal pathway in Boddam, as part of the Energetica Walking and Wildlife Festival on Saturday, August 15.

The participants in the Peterhead CCS Geological Journey, pictured at Boddam Hall on their return from the 2.5 km walk.

The participants in the Peterhead CCS Geological Journey, pictured at Boddam Hall on their return from the 2.5 km walk.

Led by geologists, the event traced the make-up and history of the multiple layers of rock that lie over the depleted Goldeneye gas reservoir, which will be the storage site for CO2 from the Peterhead Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Project.

There were nine stops along the walk, each focusing on a different theme and rock sample, with an associated experiment and activity explaining why the reservoir – which is 100 km offshore – is an optimal location to store CO2 from the Peterhead Power Station.

Denise Horan, Shell’s Stakeholder Engagement and Communications Manager for the Peterhead CCS project, said: “The walk was a wonderful opportunity to share with the community the geology of the CO2 storage site that has been chosen for the project.

“They were able to ask questions of our geo-guides to improve their knowledge and were challenged to test what they learned in fun and creative ways.

“We want to bring the local community with us as we progress on our Peterhead CCS journey and this was another step in our efforts to do that.”

The participants then returned to Boddam Public Hall where they were treated to a creative interpretation of how the CO2 will be captured, transported and stored by local community group Theatre Modo.

There was also a selection of crafts, activities, competitions and rock-themed snacks for people to enjoy, and the geological guides were on hand to further explain the fascinating detail of the area’s sub-sea rock layers.