Duke sees how his trust’s work makes a difference

HRH The Duke of Rothesay meets Peterhead Sea Cadets at the Scottish Maritime Academy.
HRH The Duke of Rothesay meets Peterhead Sea Cadets at the Scottish Maritime Academy.

Prince Charles, Duke of Rothesay, has met young people who have turned their lives around with help from his charity, The Prince’s Trust.

The visit was part of a series of engagements HRH carried out in the North-east on Tuesday.

HRH The Duke of Rothesay watches Maritime Academy students take on a practical task.

HRH The Duke of Rothesay watches Maritime Academy students take on a practical task.

The Prince visited Aberdeen Foyer in Peterhead to meet young people taking part in his charity’s Team programme.

Team is a 12-week personal development course which helps unemployed young people aged 16-25 to gain the skills and confidence they need to find work, while making a positive difference in their community.

His Royal Highness was joined by Prince’s Trust Team leader, Bryan MacKay, for a tour of the centre, where he met young people who have secured work or are now studying at college after completing the Team programme.

One group of young people recently involved in the 100th Team programme run by the Foyer redecorated a storage container at Dales Park Primary School for their community project, completing fundraising activities to buy the materials they required.

HRH The Duke of Rothesay meets princes Trust Team members in Peterhead.

HRH The Duke of Rothesay meets princes Trust Team members in Peterhead.

During the visit, HRH heard from several young people who have completed the Team programme.

They included Simon Gemmel, 23, from Peterhead, who faced multiple barriers to success before he discovered The Prince’s Trust, including family breakdown, substance misuse and difficulties at school.

Simon was diagnosed with Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity disorder and by the time he was 15, his violent behaviour had led to exclusions and he dropped out, spending his time hanging about with older boys. This led to drug taking and involvement in serious criminal activity, resulting in Simon entering the criminal justice system.

Simon’s support worker referred him to The Prince’s Trust Team programme, where he learned how to control his anger, work in a team and build positive relationships with peers and authority figures. After completing the programme, he succeeded in getting a job in the rig supplies industry and became a Young Ambassador for The Prince’s Trust.

HRH THE DUKE OF ROTHESAY MEETS PRINCE'S TRUST TEAM MEMBERS IN PETERHEAD.

HRH THE DUKE OF ROTHESAY MEETS PRINCE'S TRUST TEAM MEMBERS IN PETERHEAD.

Allan Watt, director of The Prince’s Trust Scotland, attended Tuesday’s event.

He said: “Our Prince’s Trust Team programmes in Peterhead and Fraserburgh, run by the Foyer, are a brilliant example of what can be achieved when different organisations work together to support local young people into work, education or training.

“We are delighted that His Royal Highness was able to meet so many young people today who have benefited from the programme, as it is thanks to his determination and leadership that the initiative exists today.”

Following the visit, HRH made his way to the Scottish Maritime Academy at the Lido.

Having last visited the site in 1997, when the building was the Maritime Museum, he toured the academy and met staff and students who had just completed their ‘Introduction to Seafishing’ course.

He also spoke with some of those enjoying a cup of tea and a snack at the Symposium Cafe before heading back to the Links where his helicopter awaited.

College principal, Liz McIntyre, said: “It has been a great opportunity for the college to demonstrate the range of training programmes we offer - not only to the fishing industry but also for those who wish to enter into or progress within the Merchant Navy.

“The Academy has a crucial role to play to supporting the skills needs of the maritime community, both in the North east of Scotland and Britain. This visit has highlighted the importance of the work carried out here both now and in the future.”